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What should I buy with $1000?

HOME FORUM RIDING FEELS GOOD FORUM TALKING ABOUT BIKES What should I buy with $1000?

This topic contains 16 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  kollib 4 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #804574

    kollib
    Participant

    I’m looking at buying a XC hardtail for $1000 or less. Any suggestions? Majority of my riding is and will be in the Don Valley and possibly the Hydrocut in Waterloo. I’m currently riding an old and tired $500 department store Diamond Back that is too small for me. The two options I’m toying between at the moment are the Specialized Rockhopper Sport and the Trek X-Caliber 7. Any advice is greatly appreciated.

    #804579

    Whynot
    Participant

    The Rokhopper is a classic hard tail, many a rider have made their foray into higher end bikes starting out on a rockhopper – can’t go wrong!

    #804581

    theguynextdoor
    Participant

    Don’t count out used bikes either. Check pinkbike’s buy/sell, you’d be surprised at what people are willing to part with. The Rockhopper would be a good rig. As long as you get something with a decent frame, you can always upgrade parts here and there and grow into it.

    Good luck

    #804582

    Youdidnotseemecrash
    Participant

    If I was in your position, I’d look for last year’s or maybe even a 2013 Norco Charger. It seems to offer slightly better components than its competitors by Trek, Giant, Specialized et al. This year $1005 (plus tax I assume) will get you an RS XC30 fork and Shimano Alivio Shadow 9 speed RD.

    #804601

    kollib
    Participant

    Alright, thanks for all your thoughts!

    #804650

    tec
    Participant

    I’ve got an 2012 X-Caliber I’m looking to part with. Well used, but still running, I’d give you a really good price.

    #804668

    jcitizen
    Participant

    I’d go used all the way. Way better value, as long as you’re not buying a wreck.

    #804714

    aragon
    Participant

    I’d go used all the way. Way better value, as long as you’re not buying a wreck.

    I don’t disagree, in general, but the problem is that many new riders have a hard time telling a “wreck” from a “good deal” when it comes to buying used, and many used-MTB sellers (none on this site, of course!) are devious enough to try pull the wool over the newb’s eyes with “never been raced, never been crashed…” when its a complete POS that has been ridden into the ground.

    So while I agree used can be the way to get a good deal, if you aren’t confident enough knowing what you are looking at, buying from a shop with warranty/service backup/new parts can be a better deal in the long run. Especially if you can find a leftover model from 2014 this time of year that fits you – you can get a great deal.

    As one rides more and gets more experienced with parts/conditions/what worn out stuff looks like, you can go off and find that diamond in the dust that is the online used MTB market.

    Just my $.02.

    #804717

    jcitizen
    Participant

    I’d go used all the way. Way better value, as long as you’re not buying a wreck.

    I don’t disagree, in general, but the problem is that many new riders have a hard time telling a “wreck” from a “good deal” when it comes to buying used, and many used-MTB sellers (none on this site, of course!) are devious enough to try pull the wool over the newb’s eyes with “never been raced, never been crashed…” when its a complete POS that has been ridden into the ground.

    So while I agree used <strong class=”d4pbbc-bold”>can be the way to get a good deal, if you aren’t confident enough knowing what you are looking at, buying from a shop with warranty/service backup/new parts can be a better deal in the long run. Especially if you can find a leftover model from 2014 this time of year that fits you – you can get a great deal.

    As one rides more and gets more experienced with parts/conditions/what worn out stuff looks like, you can go off and find that diamond in the dust that is the online used MTB market.

    Just my $.02.

    Good points for sure. Unfortunately 1000 bucks gets you very little in the MTB department these days, unless you wanna go single speed and rigid. Something a couple of years old that is busted may have some problems, but there’s the opportunity of some key elements being of way higher quality, like the frame or front fork, which could make it a worthy long term investment. Cheap forks and frames really are the worst.

    Might be best to get a bike nerd to help you out a bit.

    #804725

    Renegade Hardware
    Participant

    1000 is really bottom of the barrel in terms of new. You *might* get a deore rear drl but chances are everything is even cheaper, the fork will be horrid, the brakes probably single piston, etc. It’s the range for people who want to bike but aren’t exactly going to bike the way we do or are actually enthusiasts. New or warranty means less if you are riding the thing hard and it’s not performing anyway.

    $1000 gets you a half decent used bike if you have someone help you find one. You could factor in $200 for replacing chain and cassette, new tires, pads and cables. Then you get someone elses ‘investment’ cheaper. It’s pretty common to have a bike less than a few years old sell for 50% less than they bought it for, and in many instances it will be much more than 50% less if you get something less popular. 26″ bikes are easy to find right now as well. Buyers market for that.

    30 seconds of search brings this up, I’m sure there are many more even better for the price.
    http://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/1793954/

    #804731

    kollib
    Participant

    Definitely leaning towards used at this point. I think for the most part I could pick out potential problems with a used bike. I’ve been keeping mine running through rather significant abuse for a while now, so I know what a trashed bike looks like.

    @tec could you PM me some details on your X-Cal?

    #804750

    kollib
    Participant

    What are people’s thoughts on a 2006 Stumpjumper FSR with new drivetrain and recently rebuilt suspension? It’s a bit of a departure from what I was originally looking for, but it seems like a decent rig.

    #804760

    Renegade Hardware
    Participant

    Hit or miss depending on it’s life and what suspension is on it. They are cool bikes, but run single shear on most of the pivots, which means you should see when the pivot bearings have been replaced. The FSR design (a true 4 bar, not the faux bars some laymen see in a kona, for instance) is nice at reducing brake chatter (it isolates the forces between brake and suspension) but isn’t the best at reducing bob, so they are fairly shock dependent.

    How much and what parts?

    #804763

    Renegade Hardware
    Participant

    Of note, I believe in the 1000$ used range, you should look into HTs. You’ll get a nicer build and lighter bike for the same $$. Not to say you can’t build up a decent FS for 1k, just saying you should get a nicer spec on a HT.

    I am selling my 07 enduro frame and shock (CCDB and RP23), for cheap, but still wouldn’t be able to build it up under 1k. Just to give you an idea.

    #804764

    jcitizen
    Participant

    Without sounding like a dick, is saving up more money an option? Unfortunately 1000 bucks is really low in this day & age. Might be worth it in the long run to get in a few hundred extra bucks now instead of a few hundred bucks in repairs to a worse bike later.

    There’s an old Macedonian saying that goes ” Poor man buys twice ”

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