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What do I have to do to make you go tubeless?

HOME FORUM RIDING FEELS GOOD FORUM TALKING ABOUT BIKES What do I have to do to make you go tubeless?

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 15 voices, and was last updated by  Dean.Campbell 6 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • #806074

    Somers
    Participant

    In other words tubeless tires are great for those who find that changing tires every few weeks is too much work 🙂

    I’m surprised this debate is still going on. Tubeless is just plain better for most riding. If you haven’t tried it yet invest the $30 or whatever it is to get a conversion kit and give it a go…worst case scenario, you don’t notice the advantages and switch back. But isn’t it worth the price of a case of beer to get a definitive answer, especially given the number of people who espouse the godliness of tubelessness?

    #806076

    jcitizen
    Participant

    In other words tubeless tires are great for those who find that changing tires every few weeks is too much work :)

    Pretty much. Not everyone needs the newest thing. I don’t have a dropper and ride a hardtail. But tubelessness and better rim design is one thing that I have really appreciated on the trail and has been simple and cheap to adopt. Tire/Rim combos and frame geo are in my mind the most important aspects of a bike.

    #806078

    Somers
    Participant

    In other words tubeless tires are great for those who find that changing tires every few weeks is too much work :)

    Pretty much. Not everyone needs the newest thing. I don’t have a dropper and ride a hardtail. But tubelessness and better rim design is one thing that I have really appreciated on the trail and has been simple and cheap to adopt. Tire/Rim combos and frame geo are in my mind the most important aspects of a bike.

    Not everyone needs the newest thing but tubeless has been around for a decade. 🙂

    Dropper post is another one of those “you need to try it” items. I thought it was a goofy idea then I gave it a whirl…now it feels weird to ride my hardtail (which doesn’t have a dropper). But that’s another topic…

    #806079

    secret agent
    Participant

    There are situations where you can burp a tubeless tire like in weird off camber positions and hitting or rolling off rocks at an odd angle. Ride Agreement Forest week in and week out and see if that can be avoided. I believe that is what caused my issues when I went tubeless. Mind you I did not have the right tires. I guess I am a dinosaur when it comes to this aspect, but so are a bunch of guys over 50 that I ride with here and there. We are all on tubes. We have been using them for over 30 years some of us to great success. I can change a tube in minutes and always carry CO2 cartridges. The last change I made on the trail was to throw in a tube into the tubeless set up and that took a bit longer cause I could not get the stem out. Still well under 10 minutes I’d say. I can’t imagine what would happen tubeless on the fat bike in -20 C like we had last year. It’s what I’m used to, and I might get Matty to set the trail bike tubeless this fall when it’s not so busy at the shop and give it ago to give it one more shot, but I am pretty sure I can live without it.

    #806084

    jcitizen
    Participant

    There are situations where you can burp a tubeless tire like in weird off camber positions and hitting or rolling off rocks at an odd angle. Ride Agreement Forest week in and week out and see if that can be avoided. I believe that is what caused my issues when I went tubeless. Mind you I did not have the right tires. I guess I am a dinosaur when it comes to this aspect, but so are a bunch of guys over 50 that I ride with here and there. We are all on tubes. We have been using them for over 30 years some of us to great success. I can change a tube in minutes and always carry CO2 cartridges. The last change I made on the trail was to throw in a tube into the tubeless set up and that took a bit longer cause I could not get the stem out. Still well under 10 minutes I’d say. I can’t imagine what would happen tubeless on the fat bike in -20 C like we had last year. It’s what I’m used to, and I might get Matty to set the trail bike tubeless this fall when it’s not so busy at the shop and give it ago to give it one more shot, but I am pretty sure I can live without it.

    Hey, it’s just bikes after all. Gotta ride what makes you feel good on.

    But… if your experience sans tubes was with older tires/rims then burps could easily have been more of an issue. I’m probably 220 with gear, my bike weighs 30lbs, and I ride lots of fast off camber stuff with soft pressures. Only time I ever burped was landing hard on my nose with the bars kinds turned after a shitty jump with an older specialized tire. I also had a non-tubeless tire blow off a stans rim, but that is asking for it, really. So, when the day comes for new tires and/or rims I think it’s worth trying it out for sure.

    #806093

    ghettocruiser
    Participant

    My road bike and my DH bike remain tubed.

    The road bike is tubed because no one can get the tires. Soon.

    The DH bike is tubed because I am now using it one or two weekends a year. I’m not gonna buy new rims/tires with that usage interval, and if I stan’d it the sealant would dry out before I used it twice.

    #806094

    Zirca
    Participant

    I too thought I was the last one on tubes. My first conversion was done myself for my fatbike, but now it’s time to do the XC bikes.

    Question: Where do you guys get your stans/orange tape and valves? I have a ton of Stans sealant, so no need for a full kit.

    I usually get online, but figured I’d try to buy local (maybe even tonight). I just find the mark-up at a lot of stores is stupid expensive for what it is vs. chain reaction.

    #806099

    Matty F
    Participant

    Question: Where do you guys get your stans/orange tape and valves? I have a ton of Stans sealant, so no need for a full kit.

    I usually get online, but figured I’d try to buy local (maybe even tonight). I just find the mark-up at a lot of stores is stupid expensive for what it is vs. chain reaction.

    We stock this stuff at Cycle Solutions Downtown, and it is the same price as on Chain Reaction. Currently waiting on more valves to come in, though. Our Beaches location may have them available.

    #806100

    Nick Boers
    Participant

    Question: Where do you guys get your stans/orange tape and valves? I have a ton of Stans sealant, so no need for a full kit.

    1″ wide .001″ thick Polyester electrical tape made by 3M, purchased through McMaster-Carr. 3M lists it in .001 and .002 thickness, but I’ve not found a source for low quantities of the .002 unless you buy the Stans. 50m roll was around $20. I use two wraps to make up for the thickness difference. It’s been great for me.

    I make my own sealant.

    #806188

    Dean.Campbell
    Participant

    New tires are on my list for the near future (next couple of weeks once i have time to deal with it), and am open to going tubeless.

    That said, I’m on a set of 26″ DT Swiss wheels from 2008, non tubeless. Given the march of progress/obsolescence, I am not about to drop money on new wheels, but fine doing a Stan’s conversion. The process looks straightforward, but are there any hurdles to be aware of before I go ahead an pick up the needed stuff?

    As to why I am still running tubes, I’d say it comes down to a mix of laziness and tight funds, plus not being too bothered about what I currently run. However, like I say, due for new tires, so why not…

    Dean

Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)

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