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(Road) Bike Fitting Reco's

HOME FORUM RIDING FEELS GOOD FORUM TALKING ABOUT BIKES (Road) Bike Fitting Reco's

This topic contains 9 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  micah356 3 years, 8 months ago.

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  • #809688

    Zirca
    Participant

    Hey gang,

    So I realize we’re mainly mountain bikers here, but I also know there are a bunch that do road.

    I’m looking to get a bike fitting done. I have the bike already, so I just need a fit to get set up properly. Any recommendations on who I should go to? I find the road world in Toronto varies from total snobs (oldschool roadie vibes) to completely clueless. By fitting I mean the standard $50 setup, not the $150+ (retul, etc).

    Thanks,

    #809689

    Matty F
    Participant

    We have certified fitters at both Cycle Solutions locations.

    However, $50 will barely get your saddle height adjusted. At my location, our cheapest fitting is $100. It is the most basic adjustment of saddle height and bar position. If you want a proper fitting, it’s $200, and I think advanced ones are $300. You’ll probably never find a Retul fitting for $150. I think they typically start in the $300-$400 range.

    #809690

    Zirca
    Participant

    Thanks. I didn’t think the $100 option was so basic. I thought that would at least get you proper stem/saddle length and basic body position. It seems like everyone is all over the place in the city.

    Duke’s doesn’t have a Retul machine, but they have the GURU. I think it’s $200 for a pro-fit on it, $150 for a basic.

    #809691

    Marley
    Participant

    I could use a proper fitting, but those prices are absurd.

    @zirca, how about we spend $50 on booze, get drunk, watch some youtube videos and hope for the best?

    #809693

    Zirca
    Participant

    ha, @marley, a good ole weeble wobble can solve a lot.

    Yeah, the machine fittings are kind of cool, as you get a full report on exactly the bike size, spacer height, stem, seat length, etc, but it’s not cheap. They fork out a lot for these machines, so I can see why. The eyeball fittings, are a bit harder to justify/swallow. For instance, $50 to just adjust your seat…

    #809694

    aerius
    Participant

    #809695

    Matty F
    Participant

    I could use a proper fitting, but those prices are absurd.

    I understand that a proper fitting isn’t practical option for everyone, but the performance-to-dollar ratio is enormous if you are even a moderately involved road cyclist. To be quite plain: If you’re not fit properly on even a mid-range road bike, you’re not coming close to using its full potential. And this isn’t a thing you can just look up on the internet and do at home. Our certified fitters get flown out of town for a week to study the science of fitting. Proper positioning is extremely important when you are sitting in one, singular position for several hours per ride.

    Just to give you a rough frame of reference: The labour rate at a high end shop is going to be $70-$100 per hour. If you’re paying for highly skilled labour like a trained fitter, it’s going to be on the upper end of that. So the average time for a basic fitting including: meeting the customer, assessing their bike, chatting about their riding style, setting their bike up in the fit station, doing all diagnostics, making all require saddle and bar height adjustments, repeating diagnostics, repeating saddle and bar height adjustments (as many times as needed), and probably a few other things. I don’t fit people so I don’t know all the details. But that usually adds up to a bit over an hour, so you pay $100.

    When you get into more advanced fittings, you start dealing with cleat positioning, assessing saddle designs for specific body shapes and riding styles, bar widths, and you get into more involved equipment like fitting stems (very expensive) and tools that measure the angles of your joints for optimal efficiency. So when you start trying to balance all manners of these issues to create the best position for a given rider, it can take many hours. Especially if you have to order parts to make the fit work. Three to four hours of work is common for this. It seems like a good deal of cash, but the performance-to-dollar ratio is huge. It costs less than a set of shifters on a decent road bike, and it will make more difference than all the Dura-Ace or Super Record anyone could ever buy for their Cervelo.

    #809696

    spreader
    Participant

    Gears Leaside. Hummed and hawed about getting a fitting, put on a thousand klicks and decided I knew the bike enough to see what the changes would be. The few minor tweaks he made (seat up a tad, bars down a bunch) made a lot of difference. If you’re riding a lot, whats $100-$200 to make ALL those miles just a little bit better.

    Also did it for the peace of mind, as my roadie is on the large size, but turns out not TOO large 🙂

    I have a free fitting for my hardtail at Gears I think, looking forward to seeing if any changes are made after the riding I’ve done and what the bike will feel like afterwards.

    #809701

    Marley
    Participant

    You make good points @matty-f and I could absolutely see there being value there for high performance cyclists. It would be nice to have $50 dirty fitting/opinion, but mostly I was just being an ass.

    #809718

    micah356
    Participant

    Well the $50 option, if it existed, would probably end up being similar to what you would accomplish yourself with internet research.

    Personally I can attest to the difference a good fitting can make.

    And for anyone considering a future purchase of a bike – most bike shops will include the $100-ish fitting with the purchase of a bike. That’s how I got mine done at Cycle Solutions. I actually only bought a frame but they included the fitting anyways.

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