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Off season training

HOME FORUM RIDING FEELS GOOD FORUM TALKING ABOUT BIKES Off season training

This topic contains 74 replies, has 19 voices, and was last updated by  singleandfixed 5 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 75 total)
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  • #818106

    Renegade Hardware
    Participant

    yea man, I’ve got some BIG moves coming next year, I’ll let you know over msger.

    also will mean more ride days, which I can’t wait for.

    #818107

    Whynot
    Participant

    This winter is all about rehab and recovery.

    I’ve had a nagging back injury for years and this spring it flared up to the point I could not ignore it any longer. Haven’t turned the pedals since early summer and don’t expect to turn wheels on dirt again until next year.

    First three vertebrae essentially do not flex, piriformis/sciatica causing major pain and discomfort and hip flexors tight as chains.

    The price of a life of poor posture, stretching and sports that involve being hunched forward (cycling and volleyball).

    #818110

    Renegade Hardware
    Participant

    This winter is all about rehab and recovery.

    I’ve had a nagging back injury for years and this spring it flared up to the point I could not ignore it any longer. Haven’t turned the pedals since early summer and don’t expect to turn wheels on dirt again until next year.

    First three vertebrae essentially do not flex, piriformis/sciatica causing major pain and discomfort and hip flexors tight as chains.

    The price of a life of poor posture, stretching and sports that involve being hunched forward (cycling and volleyball).

    It’s 99.9% your hip flexors that are pulling your back out of alignment. Been there, done that (for almost 15 years I suffered from this!). I’ll shoot you a txt with what I did to alleviate it. If your hip flexors are tight and you have back problems, it’s almost always the hip is being pulled down from the front, compressing the spine and pinching nerves.

    http://www.cooperinstitute.org/2016/07/15/are-tight-hip-flexors-contributing-to-your-low-back-pain

    Note that cycling is a major cause of this!

    One trick I used, was spending a lot of time rolling out the inner thigh muscles (being careful around the knee as this is a tendon and doesn’t like being rolled). Just one session of this along with rolling my IT band and piriformis area, as painful as it is, loosened up my back so much the pain was gone. Consecutive sessions almost eliminated it entirely.

    This also works well if you do have spinal injuries (I had a bulging disk from an accident), as the tight flexors tug on the hips and put more pressure on the damaged spine.

    #818113

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    Tight hips and Piriformis are pretty common among cyclists, as is the Iliotibial Band (IT). It’s also not great for upper back and shoulder mobility. We sit in a cycling position for most of our day so being in that same position during exercise can greatly exacerbate the situation.

    While it’s great that I have a gym that allows me to load up weight and perform full-body, compound movements, it’s the bands, boxes, broom stick, balls, mini-bands, rollers and mat that get the most use. I spend at least an hour a day stretching before any strength work or a ride. When I did the ST6, I stretched an hour before and after each day. I’d of been a pretzel otherwise.

    Most of my program consists of working small opposing muscle groups to balance those overused during my sport. 80% of my training involves unilateral movements. Starting from the ground up – emphasis on stabilizing the ankles, knees, core and back. All to improve posture and eventually build power. I finish my workouts with a big compound movement, but only if my form was good during the unilateral work.

    It’s a lot more fun to go burn a DH lap or move big weight but often it’s the smaller rehabilitation and form work that eventually makes you faster and more fit on the bike. Every guy wants to do bench and biceps when they go to the gym but that contributes nothing significant to most sports. Working one individual muscle rarely does when it comes to an athletic program.. I always look at it as the sport is what breaks you down and the training is what builds you up. It’s work for sure but if it means reducing injury and making it so that you can ride more, further and harder than it’s worth.

    This time of year I feel so weak when I get back in the gym, old injuries start to resurface but never as bad as when I started to address them and make a priority in my off season.

    Take the time to get yourself healthy, it’s worth it. If you’re’ hunched over and in pain now, it’s not going to get better.

    It takes a while to undo a lifetime of bad posture and the returns are slow but when you do get that increased mobility it feels amazing and you’ll wonder why it took you so long to get on the program. Lots of time between now and the spring to get healthy. I’d start simply with a mat, bands, broom stick and a roller combined with some core work and stretching. It’s rarely strength thats holding us back but more fitness and form.

    Get after it!

    #818114

    Renegade Hardware
    Participant

    your setup looks sweet Marc. What’s the monthly rate for us???? haha

    #818116

    Shortcuttomoncton
    Participant

    How’s the Wahoo Kickr? I’m not a trainer person but I’ve wondered if the new breed of iPad-enabled smart trainers would make it a more enjoyable process. Hey, we can all look forward to the day when we don’t need to get out of our basement in order to ride the Don……lol :\

    #818122

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    your setup looks sweet Marc. What’s the monthly rate for us???? haha

    Haha. Not sure my wife would go for that. 🙂

    #818123

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    How’s the Wahoo Kickr? I’m not a trainer person but I’ve wondered if the new breed of iPad-enabled smart trainers would make it a more enjoyable process. Hey, we can all look forward to the day when we don’t need to get out of our basement in order to ride the Don……lol :\

    The Kickr has been great so far. I’m spinning it out with a compact crankset so will need to gear up. This is mostly due to my program calling for high cadence at lower watts. Lots of resistance as far as a hill climb simulations on Zwift. Feels very realistic as far as exertion is concerned.

    Setup-wise, I am just running it off my iPhone mirrored to an Apple TV hooked up to HD flat screen on the wall. This works great. I’m sure a tablet would be fine. Just needs to be big enough to see data from a core function/instruction perspective. Having a bigger display certainly adds to the experience, specially for Zwift. HDTVs are so cheap these days, I don’t think a similar setup would run you much.

    I have always just streamed some MTB movies to pass the time but the programs are intense enough to keep me focused. I am amerced in the intervals and workout. Time is actually passing more quickly following a program than watching flicks for me. Just the session at hand and some tunes is working great.

    #818169

    jhop
    Participant

    I owned a trainer in the
    past and haaaaaated it, it was also way too noisy to use in a shared space at the time. I now have a garage i could set up in and am extremely motivated to keep my bike fitness up and hopefully improved over the winter season….but still hesitant to shell out for a trainer after my unimpressive initial experience with it.

    Fasttimes, as you stated above, i have found non bike specific stretching and strength training to be paying dividends on the bike and am tempted to just focus on that and some self indulgent cross training (snowboarding in BC and QC) this winter to keep the fitness high. what are your thoughts on a bike light winter cross training winter to be stronger come spring?

    I have some big hopes for the future, largely down to the awesome articles on this site about singletrack6 (not in the cards for 18 but hopefully the following year) and paris to ancaster. never been to a race and no interest in podium chasing, but need an event to keep focused.

    thanks for all the articles and motivation on the site everyone, think im stripping down the fs for the season but have next years goals in sight already!

    #818170

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    Thanks @jhop Happy to hear you’re enjoying the site.

    I also hate trainers and have never observed any real gains using them. At best, it kept a very sad level of cardio present until the spring. I even went from a rear-wheel trainer to a dedicated spin bike a few years back to try and improve the experience. It was better in several ways but still served up nothing but mind and butt numbing boredom with an dismal lack of progress. Even with bike movies playing on the big screen, it was unbearable. Without a dedicated program there is really no point to spinning away indoors. I would try and get some intervals in but now knowing what programmed intervals are, have come to understand I was in no mans land.

    Getting a fatbike and riding through the winter has been a ton of fun. I most definitely hit the ground running in the spring and it was night and day compared to spinning indoors. While it was a vast improvement, it still wasn’t training and the results were indicative of that. And while the fatbike is the ultimate adventure bike, ready for just about anything, there are lots of days even it wont get you far. Furthermore, if your trying to really make a go of it you need to focus on that big base in the fall before trying to build over the winter. These are more about long 3-5hr days on a cross/road/gravel bike. Logic similar to the, 2000 hours for a 2min fight approach. The base method has been refuted by some as of late but I still feel it’s relevant, particulate if your looking to participate in long, multi-day events. The`greater the foundation is, the stronger your overall conditioning and ultimate peak performance could reach. Lots of already fit riders are moving to sweet spot workouts instead but the jury is out on that as well. Even after a furious season, finishing at the top of your game, a base segment is a smart play. All that to say, you need a program if you want to succeed. A base. build and specialty program is typically 18 – 26 weeks long.

    What I have come to learn is that the work happens indoors and the fun outdoors. You simply cannot replicate the quality of a dedicated indoor workout outside and in no way come close to the fun experienced riding outdoors while training inside. Sure, with a good power meter, safe roads and weather on your side it’s possible, but that’s not really what Canadian winters are providing us. Getting 3-6, 1hr+ training rides in, while hitting all your marks, would be tough. This is why many racers head to training camps in Arizona to get the work done. So for this winter, I am making the switch to the trainer for quality and the fatbike for fun. Unless a trip to AZ is in the cards, then it’s see ya later to both 🙂

    Compared to the basic trainer, the smart trainer has been amazing. The trainer follows a program or course and ramps up the watts up or down on queue. I never thought you could get that kind of a workout on a trainer. It’s really hard and I am a puddle of sweat by the end of it. Time goes by much quicker and I am destroyed by the end of it. I miss riding outdoors and hope to add that back in soon. Right now, with 3 days on the smart trainer and 2 days of strength training, I have nothing left. Hopefully, as I get stronger, I can resumer those fun rides. I’m also perfectly ok to miss a training day to ride outdoors. You cant lose sight of why your doing any of this. But I do have a goal so must strike the balance.

    If you’re on the fence and don’t want to make the commitment to a smart trainer i’d hit up one of the many spin classes, such as at Sweet Pete’s, a few days a week. http://www.sweetpetes.com/about/indoor-cycling-sessions-pg230.htm Combined with some fun winter rides, you’re off to the races.

    Full disclosure, I’m no expert. I am just an enthusiast trying to get fitter and be ready for some epic adventures or events, whatever they are. If you’re serious about training, I would hit up The Cycling Gym. https://www.thecyclinggym.com[/url%5D

    1 user thanked author for this post.
    #818186

    BlurredLines
    Participant

    Maybe relevant, maybe not, but the Fatbike really enhanced my skills handling the bike. The core required to keep it together in the snow and slop is pretty intense and translates to unreal ability to read terrain and keep your self on the line you want to when it’s dirt season. Biggest recommendation on the whole Fatbike approach is get a decent Dropper Post.

    Otherwise, maybe I’ll catch some folks at those Indoor Cycling Sessions, they worked out really well for me last winter!

    #818192

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    Totally relevant. Riding a fat bike requires not only solid core strength and bike handling skills but adequate muscle endurance to slow grind or spin-up through the snow. 30km on a fatbike is a legit ride. And a hill is never just a hill – up or down. I really love fat biking, or as I look at it, a trail riding. A good bike on good trails is like nothing else. Stoked to get out this winter. Sounds like its gonna be a doozy.

    I actually don’t have a dropper on my fatbike. I bought one but never installed it. I kind of like the completely rigid low tech ride for this bike. I find the number one biggest factor to having a good fat bike season is tires. I’ll start a new fatbike thread for this season so we can chat setups.

    #818234

    Atom
    Participant

    I’ve been going pretty hard on the bike the last few years, which has stripped more and more muscle off of my frame. My goal is to hit the weights and see if I can gain at least 5lb of muscle. I’ll get back onto a trainer in March. I do think it very beneficial to get a month of indoor work in before the outdoor begins, but I cannot stare down an entire winter of trainer use.

    Otherwise, I’m looking to keep up general fitness and health through a bit of home yoga and stretching, xc skiing if it snow this winter, as well as some extra attention on shoulder strength. I’m about 95% recovered from a shoulder injury this fall, but it’s taken a lot of stretching and strengthening to get to where I am.

    #818236

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    Sounds well thought out. Good balance of outdoor and indoor.

    I blew off a training ride for a fun one yesterday. Had a bit too much fun and hit the deck, re-injuring my shoulder. Good news is the strength training, particularly rotor cuff exercises, do help and it’s not as bad as it could have been. I’ll have to miss a few days but should be back much quicker this time. It’s mountain biking, we’re gonna go down, but we can train to minimize the damage.

    #818238

    Atom
    Participant

    Oh no! Glad it wasn’t worse. Shoulders are a weak spot and definitely worth fortifying.

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