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Home Mechanic "Must Haves"

HOME FORUM RIDING FEELS GOOD FORUM TECH TALK Home Mechanic "Must Haves"

This topic contains 58 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  FastTimes 1 year, 10 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 59 total)
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  • #799570

    Buck
    Participant

    That’s a pretty good deal. I modified my own with my milling machine. The hard part was finding a 26mm socket without having to order it from Snap-On. Sears and Can-Tire don’t carry 26.

    I’ve been getting my odd-ball large metric sockets from Princess Auto. They have a decent selection of them and sell individually.

    They also have the large hex/allen keys that they sell individually. I needed a 14mm, and sure enough they had it!

    #799575

    Matty F
    Participant

    That’s a pretty good deal. I modified my own with my milling machine. The hard part was finding a 26mm socket without having to order it from Snap-On. Sears and Can-Tire don’t carry 26.

    I’ve been getting my odd-ball large metric sockets from Princess Auto. They have a decent selection of them and sell individually.

    My 26mm came from Lowes, but they can indeed be tricky to find. The 28mm was particularly tough to get. In the case of a 32mm socket, it might be easier to find a 1 1/4 socket, which is what I’ve been using (works out to 31.8mm). However, if I can get a pre-machined one for $20 with a 6-point head, I will be doing that in the future without question.

    #799582

    Matty F
    Participant

    I recently ordered the new Park IR-1 internal cable routing tool set. I won’t have them until Tuesday, but these may prove to be one of the most valuable tools I own. I’ve spent enough time poking around inside frames with a bent spoke and a Maglite to drive most people mad.

    #799592

    the medurn
    Participant

    That’s a pretty good deal. I modified my own with my milling machine. The hard part was finding a 26mm socket without having to order it from Snap-On. Sears and Can-Tire don’t carry 26.

    I’ve been getting my odd-ball large metric sockets from Princess Auto. They have a decent selection of them and sell individually.

    My 26mm came from Lowes, but they can indeed be tricky to find. The 28mm was particularly tough to get. In the case of a 32mm socket, it might be easier to find a 1 1/4 socket, which is what I’ve been using (works out to 31.8mm). However, if I can get a pre-machined one for $20 with a 6-point head, I will be doing that in the future without question.

    I got mine from McMasterCarr – it was $12 or something like that.

    #799658

    Whynot
    Participant

    Air compressor.
    Not just for tires, great for blowing off dust and junk in hard to reach places, grips (even lock ons when they are a little stubborn to remove).

    Loctite. Essential.

    Torque wrench.

    #799910

    bigairgar
    Participant

    I needed a new folding saw and got 2 nice options from this post, so thx for that.

    In my riding pack my must haves include most items mentioned here with the following extras:
    – MEC small waterproof first aid kit ($12),
    – ADVIL for when I crash and hurt myself (often)
    – Mechanics wire and duct tape
    – Matches and Toilet Paper or wet wipes. When you spend all day in the forest, nature often calls and a fire for those cold, damp days is amazing.

    Finally….BEER and SAUSAGE are almost always with me to!

    I go to a whole other level for my CHAINSAW pack !!!

    #799911

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    I recently ordered the new Park IR-1 internal cable routing tool set. I won’t have them until Tuesday, but these may prove to be one of the most valuable tools I own. I’ve spent enough time poking around inside frames with a bent spoke and a Maglite to drive most people mad.

    That set is getting added to my list for sure.

    Also looking at the press fit bb tools from Park.

    #801036

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    I have gone on a bit of a tool binge this winter. I reorganized my home garage and am really looking forward to wrenching and better maintaining my bikes this season. I’ll start to post up more of my recent purchases and some oldies I found during my reorganizing.

    http://www.abbeybiketools.com/products/single-sided-crombie

    #801047

    Matty F
    Participant

    A note on the Crombie Tool: The key feature of this is that you do not have to remove a QR skewer from the wheel in order to get the cassette off. I believe it’s the only cassette tool with this feature. I don’t have one, but it’s on my hit list. For a home mechanic removing the skewer is a negligible amount of time. But for a pro mechanic who has to do that many times a day, the price of the tool will quickly pay itself off. However, it’s not terribly expensive either way, and quite a nice addition.

    A recent favourite of mine:

    I liked the first one I got so much that I bought two more. The design of the opener itself is impressive, having a rotor tool makes it an easy addition to a riding pack, and it only weighs 35g (you really have to pick it up to appreciate how light it actually is). Abbey makes a similar bottle/rotor tool, but the opener functions is not nearly as nice, and it’s a bit larger/heavier.

    #801059

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    I have always made my own bearing pullers and presses with threaded rods, nuts and washers but it was never perfect. You can get by with sockets and even PVC tubes will do an ok job but with three Maestro suspension bikes this season, I thought a proper bearing press/removal kit was justified.

    I also procured a complete set of these which cover every possible bearing size used on my other bikes.

    #801067

    Whynot
    Participant

    ^^Nice investment, Marc.

    I’ve always gone the homemade route for pullers and presses. I just can’t bite the bullet and start buying these tools. I don’t ride enough to warrant frequent bearing changes on my bikes, and it seems every application is different. I’d have a toolbox full of pullers and presses between bikes, snowmobile/atv clutches and bearings, MX bearings…

    #801081

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    ^^Nice investment, Marc.

    I’ve always gone the homemade route for pullers and presses. I just can’t bite the bullet and start buying these tools. I don’t ride enough to warrant frequent bearing changes on my bikes, and it seems every application is different. I’d have a toolbox full of pullers and presses between bikes, snowmobile/atv clutches and bearings, MX bearings…

    I dont typically swap my bearing out more than once a year. I check them periodically and give them a spin and repack them. Unlike hub and bottom bracket bearings, suspension bearings only move though part of their range so giving them a spin every 3-6 months goes a long way to keeping them rolling smooth. The custom pullers are really due to the new carbon frames. I just want to take extra care when I do need to service them.

    #801111

    friendlyfoe
    Participant

    *drool* you just made me realize i have no idea how to repack my shimano press fit BB

    #801113

    Matty F
    Participant

    Ya don’t repack modern bottom brackets generally. Just get a new one.

    #801467

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    I bought an air compressor the first year I went Tubeless racing DH. It’s been great for all sorts of shop stuff. I just recently added this Park Tool Shop Inflator and retraceable hose setup to it.

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 59 total)

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