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Home Mechanic "Must Haves"

HOME FORUM RIDING FEELS GOOD FORUM TECH TALK Home Mechanic "Must Haves"

This topic contains 58 replies, has 17 voices, and was last updated by  FastTimes 1 year, 10 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 59 total)
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  • #799506

    fietser
    Participant

    Having just moved into my own apartment, I no longer have a basement to keep my bikes and tools in. So the toolbox is now in the living room next to the couch. It works for me.

    Ha! I love it @micah356! Throw on a plant and bolt up a lamp and you have function and fashion.

    #799507

    BlurredLines
    Participant

    Really apprciating all the responses, and hopefully this is helping some others out with their home kits. It sounds like a stand and somewhere (bench, pegboard, or box) to keep tools is a pretty consistent “Must Have”. Folding stands seem practical for those without a place to consistently have them set up. Anything you folks with one look for in a stand or have had less than desirable experiences with? Would a proper “shop” quality stand have been a preferred investment in hind-sight?

    For guys like Micah and myself living in an apartment without a garage I’ve also been considering a large corrosion resistant floor mat. I can imagine the sigh of relief from my wife that there won’t be dried up clay nuggets everywhere or an extra polished looking spot on the floor from a break bleeding mishap.

    The pack saw I cannot agree with more. I certainly felt unprepared on a few of my recent rides and awful guilty that I wasn’t able to clear some of the crowns that had fallen over the trails. Absolutely on my wish list and a Boxing Day purchase otherwise.

    Again really appreciate all the feedback, keep it coming!

    #799508

    micah356
    Participant

    When my bikes were in the basement, I bought a giant roll of plastic from the hardware store, taped the corners so that it had about a one-inch tall lip all the way around. It worked great to catch all the dirt and melted snow in winter. But it looks super nasty, so I’m going to have to look for a nicer mat to put in the living room. As of yet my bikes haven’t made the move to my new place yet.

    #799511

    Renegade Hardware
    Participant

    Good alen keys are found from machinery supply stores. Save a bundle by not getting park or pedros, and get equally good if not better tools. Wiha drivers are the best of the best. Bahco files and wrenches.

    I must disagree somewhat about the allen keys. While I admittedly haven’t tried every folding allen key set, the Park ones are the best I’ve used. And you surely won’t save much money by trying to get something cheaper. They retail for $13, and I get 1-2 years out of them as a full time mechanic. That equates to at least a decade of use for a home mechanic. My own home set is four years old. You could maybe get another folding set as cheaper as $5, but considering the quality you are guaranteed for $13 I would certainly think it is not worth the risk.

    http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-Allen-HXS-Wrench-1-2/dp/B006QSORIG

    Vs

    http://www.amazon.com/Bondhus-22199-L-wrench-Double-1-5-10mm/dp/B000E7VG5C/ref=sr_1_cc_3?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1418150756&sr=1-3-catcorr&keywords=Bondhus+hex+key

    Note that the park ‘professional’ ones are made by Bondhus…… That’s what I have used for years. A rusty old die takes a lot more force than bike parts 😉

    Or there’s Wiha hex keys as well, which are a bit less than the Park ones as well.

    With Park hex keys, you’re paying for the name. Bondhus makes them, and sells their own at half the price. With regards to folding keys, I’d go with Park over other mtb brands for sure, as the other brands tend to roll corners pretty easily. However, remember who made Parks keys? …. http://www.amazon.com/Bondhus-12533-GorillaGrip-Fold-up-Triple/dp/B000E7VG4S/ref=pd_sim_hi_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0AP7FQ90R4ARWMNY4YA0 😉

    #799515

    Matty F
    Participant

    Note that the park ‘professional’ ones are made by Bondhus…… That’s what I have used for years. A rusty old die takes a lot more force than bike parts ;)

    Ah yes, Bondhus. I’ve heard good things, but never tried them. They were actually in some of my bike distributor catalogues for a while. I’ll have to try a set of their individual L-shape hexes.

    The Park sets that I was faithfully referring to in my above post were the folding sets. I have no preference for any other style of hex wrench, really.

    Folding stands seem practical for those without a place to consistently have them set up. Anything you folks with one look for in a stand or have had less than desirable experiences with? Would a proper “shop” quality stand have been a preferred investment in hind-sight?

    I would say a proper shop quality stand wouldn’t be practical for most people. What it boils down to is that, with a proper base, they cost almost $1,000, and weigh probably 100 lbs. So if you have a dedicated work space that you can leave the stand in full time, and the adequate cash, then it will be excellent. However, I figure those two factors would be prohibitive for the great, great majority of people.

    There is, however, the option of getting a shop-quality arm/clamp that mounts to a bench, wall or pillar. These can be had for about the same price as a top quality home/portable stand, but obviously these are pretty much not portable at all. I also like my clamp to be about four feet off the ground, so I would need a pretty tall bench to get a bench-mount model up to that height.

    #799516

    MikeC
    Participant

    Proper Cable Cutters! Every home shop needs them.

    #799518

    secret agent
    Participant

    As mentioned previously. Dremmel tool with cutting blade does a great job for casings and cables. When cutting cables with something that is rotating like that, it is important to wrap the cable with tape first. Cut in the middle of the wrapped section. Keeps the strands nicely together.
    I have several clear stackable boxes with parts and those small clear boxes with lots of compartments for small pieces. I have a small closet dedicated just to bike specific tools and parts.

    I know it may not look great, but I use cardboard as my working surface on the floor. We have long boxes that are pretty thick at work. I double them up. The cardboard absorbs oils and water just fine and is also nicely shock and scratch resistant if you are working on hardwoods or any delicate surface. It folds up or tucks away nicely when not in use. It can be thrown out when too ratty looking or dirty. It is also easy to vacuum after you are done. It helps that I can get big pieces form work.

    #799522

    MikeC
    Participant

    As mentioned previously. Dremmel tool with cutting blade does a great job for casings and cables. When cutting cables with something that is rotating like that, it is important to wrap the cable with tape first. Cut in the middle of the wrapped section. Keeps the strands nicely together.

    Seems more complicated than a good set of cutters. A good set of cutters keeps the strands together as well. Plus more mobile friendly 🙂

    #799525

    secret agent
    Participant

    I agree. someone gave me a nice Dremmel set with a lot of blades and bits and stones, and a little work stand and I found it useful for a lot of different things. Sometimes you find something that works by accident. This was the case when I wanted to cut a cable and could not find my good cutters. I used it and that’s how I found out that if you don’t use tape, it messes up the strands. I would not go out and buy one of these for doing this job specifically, but If you have one, buy a good cutting blade and you will see that particularly for casings, it does a fantastic job. No collapse of the casing at all.

    #799530

    MikeC
    Participant

    I No collapse of the casing at all.

    That’s definitely a nice benefit.

    #799543

    Trailhead
    Participant

    Hey Matt, I’ll see your spokes and raise car antenna’s 🙂

    One of my favorite is the chain holding tool

    #799565

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    I also just added a flat 32mm socket for servicing my Fox forks. I have made my own in the past (with bench grinder) and have also used a crescent wrench but nothing beats a proper, machined socket.

    Attachments:
    1. 32flat.jpg

    Attachments:
    #799567

    Matty F
    Participant

    I also just added a flat 32mm socket for servicing my Fox forks. I have made my own in the past (with bench grinder) and have also used a crescent wrench but nothing beats a proper, machined socket.

    These make a world of difference.

    Note that the 32mm socket works on 36mm and 40mm stanchion Fox forks. a 32mm stanchion requires a 26mm socket, and a 34mm stanchion requires a 28mm socket.

    If you’re in the market for one of these, our friends at Suspension Werx are turning down Unior 6-point sockets and selling them for $20.

    #799568

    FastTimes
    Keymaster

    I also just added a flat 32mm socket for servicing my Fox forks. I have made my own in the past (with bench grinder) and have also used a crescent wrench but nothing beats a proper, machined socket.

    These make a world of difference.

    Note that the 32mm socket works on 36mm and 40mm stanchion Fox forks. a 32mm stanchion requires a 26mm socket, and a 34mm stanchion requires a 28mm socket.

    If you’re in the market for one of these, our friends at Suspension Werx are turning down Unior 6-point sockets and selling them for $20.

    I hope that going into this season I wont have any bikes with 32mm forks 🙂

    That’s a good price from Suspension Werks.

    #799569

    Nick Boers
    Participant

    These make a world of difference.

    Note that the 32mm socket works on 36mm and 40mm stanchion Fox forks. a 32mm stanchion requires a 26mm socket, and a 34mm stanchion requires a 28mm socket.

    If you’re in the market for one of these, our friends at Suspension Werx are turning down Unior 6-point sockets and selling them for $20.

    That’s a pretty good deal. I modified my own with my milling machine. The hard part was finding a 26mm socket without having to order it from Snap-On. Sears and Can-Tire don’t carry 26.

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