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Crossing a tiny creek with rocks..

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This topic contains 6 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by  sumskillz 8 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #505332

    Canadmos
    Participant

    Has anyone tried to cross a tiny creek, by only putting rocks down instead of making a bridge?

    I want to go the rock route for 2 or 3 reasons.

    1) This little stream is only about 3 feet across

    2) The stream is brand new and has been created by run off from nearby house construction sites.

    3) There is no actual water in it, at the moment. It is rock solid and the dirt in the bed of the stream is a different colour. It appears that it only flows during really heavy rain or the spring time.

    So does it seem appropriate to embed some rocks to cross it on? It seems like a waste of effort to build a bridge, not knowing if the stream will even be there in a year due to the movements of the construction nearby.

    #642639

    sumskillz
    Participant

    if it flash floods seasonally, the rocks will move. I’d rather reshape the banks to make a smooth, low grade, roll in and out, in a part of the riverbed that is firm. It should not require maintenance. Speaking of subdivison terraforming, there is a huge moonscape on Bloomington sideroad and Yonge I’d love to ride.

    #642638

    Nick Boers
    Participant

    I’d wait and see. I’ve used rocks and construction debris to cross small drains in a few spots that don’t flow fast, and they have worked well.

    If it goes away, perfect. If it becomes a problem, deal with it then.

    Of course, if you build a simple bridge and it isn’t needed in a year, remove it and save it for later.

    #642637

    Trailhead
    Participant

    If it’s 3′ across I’d just hop/manual it until it becomes a problem.

    #642636

    Whynot
    Participant

    Do what you can to make it able to be traversed as is. If it only flows during heavy rainfall then a rock birdge would most likely divert the flow and create more erosion, turning your 3ft technical feature into a 6ft trail-building challenge. If it is a deep, quare-edged rut, build a small lip and gap it… it’s only half a bike length 🙂

    #642635

    Canadmos
    Participant

    Thanks for the tips. Good point about the rocks potentially making it wider too.

    I guess seeing as how its dry right now, I won’t even worry about doing anything. Just ride it as is. On the grander scheme of things, perhaps I should finish routing the trail first, before I worry about this haha. No one likes dead ends…

    #642634

    bootjamesout
    Participant

    Hate me too, lol Funny after a ride you take a bath ( maybe) as you dip your toe’s in to test if water at the right temp. Why did we all bought sealed moving parts. Winter vs ___~
    Ride it. Here it’s ok to get your feet wet. What time of season is now, sweat, smell those from here. As the cat place’s them shoe in kiddy litter box.

    Just cut off an old pair of socks at the toe end ( or what you can think of) for a seal, like a old fork boot. Sand in shoe grinds past skin into bone..

    Time out, just think, if you took a trip to a hill 2.000′ + high as you camp out to ride this hill. Rain out for 48 hours, all the trails are the water run off’s. As edging to ride, go around as the main park/hill gate close. Just don’t go all the way down. :demonsmiley

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